About North-East

India’s North East, called the land of the seven sisters, is a region which can be best described as virgin, wild and untouched from the modernizations taking elsewhere in the world. It is a region guarded by mountains, the only passage being a narrow stretch of land some 40 km wide, called the Siliguri Corridor. Beyond this corridor lies the seven sister states of North-Eastern India, each state more beautiful than the other, each with its own cultures and beliefs, each having its own charm. Because of the regions inaccessibility from the rest of world, it has been lucky enough to maintain most of its natural diversity.

There is great religious and ethnic diversity within the seven states. The people of the North-East live a very simple life, all the various tribes and cultures still live in accordance to the environment, and nature plays a very big role in their survival. Around 60 – 70 percent of the population is predominantly tribal, and they carry a lot of resemblance to many Tibeto-Burman, Mongolian and Austro-Asiatic cultures. Christianity and Hinduism are the other dominant beliefs. A trip to North-East remains incomplete if one doesn’t witnesses these many distinct tribes The sub-tropical climate along with a lot of monsoon rains has helped create one of the last remaining great wildernesses of India in this region. The forests of Northeast are a treasure trove bio-diversity and is one of the most important ecological hotspot of the world. The flora and fauna count is astounding, with a list of hundreds of mammals, thousand of birds, thousands of plant species. And yet, there are many species that are waiting to be discovered from the very unexplored region.

The great valleys of the mighty Brahmaputra River never fails to mesmerize a passing soul, taking a person back in time, allowing him to shed all his burdens and instead just relax and connect with nature. The rapids of this mighty river upstream in the Himalayan Landscape are supposedly one of the very best spots in the world to test your mettle in white water rafting. The Tea-Gardens of Assam gives the region a certain laid back Colonial-era charm, where one can sip on one of the best tea’s of the world, and do nothing else but gaze out at all the surrounding greenery.

Rapids and rivers, Himalayan mountains on 3 sides, forests echoing with the voices of the creatures that live inside, tribal people living in perfect harmony with nature, hunting and fishing, sweet aroma of tea in the air, Golden Mahseer to river Dolphins - North East is indeed a paradise waiting to be explored.where to begin from. And then, there is always a chance of discovering a new species of mammal, or a plant or insect, and getting a chance to name them according to your wishes.


How to reach ?

  • Siliguri is the gateway to the Dooars. Cooch Behar, being the headquarters of the North Bengal State Transport Corporation, is well – connected by long distance bus routes to Siliguri as well as Guwahati.
  • There is a railway service connecting Guwahati via New Jalpaiguri. One can also avail the railway service via Alipurduar.
  • The nearest airport is Bagdogra, connecting Guwahati.

Places to Visit

Kaziranga National Park

Kaziranga is located between latitudes 26°30' N and 26°45' N, and longitudes 93°08' E to 93°36' E within two districts in the Indian state of Assam—the Kaliabor subdivision of Nagaon district and the Bokakhat subdivision of Golaghat district.

The park is approximately 40 km (25 mi) in length from east to west, and 13 km (8 mi) in breadth from north to south. Kaziranga covers an area of 378 km2 (146 sq mi), with approximately 51.14 km2 (20 sq mi) lost to erosion in recent years. A total addition of 429 km2 (166 sq mi) along the present boundary of the park has been made and designated with separate national park status to provide extended habitat for increasing the population of wildlife or, as a corridor for safe movement of animals to Karbi Anglong Hills. Elevation ranges from 40 m (131 ft) to 80 m (262 ft). The park area is circumscribed by the Brahmaputra River, which forms the northern and eastern boundaries, and the Mora Diphlu, which forms the southern boundary. Other notable rivers within the park are the Diphlu and Mora Dhansiri.

Kaziranga contains significant breeding populations of 35 mammalian species, of which 15 are threatened as per the IUCN Red List. The park has the distinction of being home to the world's largest population of the Greater One-Horned Rhinoceros (1,855), wild Asiatic water buffalo (1,666) and eastern swamp deer (468). Significant populations of large herbivores include elephants (1,940), gaur (30) and sambar (58). Small herbivores include the Indian muntjac, wild boar, and hog deer. Kaziranga has the largest population of the Wild water buffalo anywhere accounting for about 57% of the world population.

Manas National Park

The park is divided into three ranges. The western range is based at Panbari, the central at Bansbari near Barpeta Road, and the eastern at Bhuiyapara near Pathsala. The ranges are not well connected; while two major rivers need to be forded in going from the centre to the Panbari, there is a rough trail (the daimAri road) connecting the central to the eastern range. Most visitors come to Bansbari and then spend some time inside the forest at Mathanguri on the Manas river at the Bhutan border.

The sanctuary has recorded 55 species of mammals, 380 species of birds, 50 of reptiles, and 3 species of amphibians. Out of these wildlife, 21 mammals are India’s Schedule I mammals and 31 of them are threatened. The Manas hosts more than 450 species of birds. It has the largest population of the endangered Bengal florican to be found anywhere. Other major bird species include giant hornbills, jungle fowls, bulbuls, brahminy ducks, kalij pheasants, egrets, pelicans, fishing eagles, serpent eagles, falcons, scarlet minivets, bee-eaters, magpie robins, pied hornbills, grey hornbills, mergansers, harriers, ospreys and herons.

Rajiv Gandhi Orang National Park

The Orang National Park, encompassing an area of 78.81 square kilometres (30.43 sq mi), lies on the north bank of the Brahmaputra river, delimited between 26.483°N 92.266°E and 26.666°N 92.45°E within the districts of Darrang and Sonitpur. Pachnoi river, Belsiri river and Dhansiri River border the park and join the Brahmaputra river. During the monsoon season, the park becomes a veritable flood plain with the many streams overlapping each other. These flood plains constitute twelve wetlands in the park, apart from the 26 man made water bodies.

Orang park contains significant breeding populations of several mammalian species. Apart from the great Indian one-horned rhinoceros, which is the dominant species of the national park, the other key species sharing the habitat are the royal Bengal tiger, Asiatic elephant, pygmy hog, hog deer and wild boar. Some important species of the critically endangered and endangered category are the following.

The pygmy hog, a small wild pig, is critically endangered and is limited to about 75 animals in captivity, confined to a very few locations in and around north-western Assam, including the Orang National Park where it has been introduced. Other mammals reported are the blind Gangetic dolphin, Indian pangolin, hog deer (Axis porcinus), rhesus macaque, Bengal porcupine, Indian fox, small Indian civet, otter, leopard cat {Prionailurus bengalensis), fishing cat (Felis viverrina) and jungle cat (Felis chaus). The great Indian one-horned rhinoceras (Rhinoceros unicornis) even though well conserved now in many national parks and in captivity, is still in the endangered list of IUCN and its population is estimated at 68, as per census carried out by the forest department, in 2006.

Kamakhya Temple

Kamakhya temple is a famous pilgrimage situated at Guwahati, Assam. The temple is located on the Nilachal hill in Guwahati at about 8 kms from the railway station. The Kamakhya temple is dedicated to the tantric goddesses. Apart from the deity Kamakhya Devi, compound of the temple houses 10 other avatars of Kali namely Dhumavati, Matangi, Bagola, Tara, Kamala, Bhairavi, Chinnamasta, Bhuvaneshwari and Tripuara Sundari.

Durga Puja is celebrated annually during Navaratri in the month of September- October. It is a three day festival attracting several visitors. A unique festival observed here is the Ambuvaci (Ameti) fertility festival wherein it is believed that the Goddess (mother Earth) undergoes her menstrual period (also see Changannur Bhagawati in Kerala). During this period the temple is closed for three days and opened with great festivity on the fourth day. It is believed to be inauspicious to till the ground or to plant seeds, during this three day period.

Elephant Falls

12 km on the outskirts of the city, the mountain stream descends through two successive falls set in dells of fern covered rocks.

Lady Hydari Park

The park stretches over a kilometre and has an adjacent mini zoo.

Wards Lake

Known locally as Nan-Polok. It is an artificial lake with garden and boating facilities.

Motphran

The “Stone of France” which is locally known as "Motphran" was erected in memory of the 26th Khasi Labour Corps who served under the British in France during World War I. It bears the words of the famous Latin poet Horace "Dulce et decorum est pro patria mori" which can be roughly translated as "It is sweet and fitting to die for one's country."

Shillong Peak

A picnic spot, 10 km from the city, 1965 m above sea level, offers a panoramic view of the scenic countryside and is the highest point in the state. Obeisance is paid to U Shulong at the sanctum sanctorum at the peak's summit every springtime, by the religious priest of Mylliem State.

Don Bosco Centre for Indigenous Cultures

The Don Bosco Museum is part of DBCIC (Don Bosco Centre for Indigenous Cultures). DBCIC comprises research on cultures, publications, training, animation programmes and the museum, which is a place of knowledge-sharing on the cultures of the northeast in particular, and of culture in general. DBCIC with its Don Bosco Museum is situated at Mawlai, Shillong.

Mawsynram

Mawsynram is located at 25° 18′ N, 91° 35′ E, at an altitude of about 1,400 metres (4,600 ft), 16 km west of Cherrapunji, in the Khasi Hills in the state of Meghalaya (India) . The name of the village contains Maw, a Khasi word meaning stone, and thus might refer to certain megaliths in the surrounding area. Khasi Hills are rich with such megaliths.

Bamboo and broom grass that is used to make Indian brooms- are among the chief plants grown in the rocky, hilly region of Meghalaya. A few locals spend all of the monsoon season and part of the winter making bamboo baskets, brooms and knups which are then sold all around the state.

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